HOW TO: Tips on replacing your Spark Plugs

Umyaya

New member
I have been running the iradinium for 2k miles. Along with a shorai lfx lithium ion battery..she fires right up now! (Was having starting issues around 10k...didn't realize need plugs at 8 k)
I am going to do this this week... Got the stock ones though instead of iradium.... Probably will get the Iradium the next time I do them.
 

OdinSon

New member
I just use the spark plug socket BUT I put some tape inside the socket to make it a more snug fit. I've found that duct tape works great.
 

Gem rod

New member
Agreed nice write up Spyder Eye.

You make no mention of lifting up the tank? I assume that this is both essential and easy?

My guess is that most of you US riders have the non-faired version? On the faired version the fixings to remove the fairing look straightforward. What do I do with these fixings just above the clocks? Do I just push in the centre bit with a suitable tool? Is there a name for this kind of fixing?

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Good advice on the radiator fixings. I presume these are the fixings you mean?

Bike RHS

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Bike LHS

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This is the plug spanner supplied with the bike. Do you recommend using this?

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The RHS outer plug looks a lot more difficult compared to the LHS outer plug. The RHS plug is just slightly inboard by comparison, presumably because the timing chain is on that side of the bike? The frame looks to hinder access to this plug but I guess it looks worse than it actually is.

Just one more point. Presumably the breather pipe running across the top of the block needs to be removed?
 

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Blackfin

New member
Agreed nice write up Spyder Eye.

You make no mention of lifting up the tank? I assume that this is both essential and easy?
I don't recall lifting the tank when I did the plugs on my Fazer. So not essential but it's handy to do to allow access to check/replace the air filter at the same time you do your plugs.

My guess is that most of you US riders have the non-faired version? On the faired version the fixings to remove the fairing look straightforward. What do I do with these fixings just above the clocks? Do I just push in the centre bit with a suitable tool? Is there a name for this kind of fixing?
Yes, gently push the centre pin "in" to unlock the clip. When you go to re-install, put the pin back so it sits proud of the surface, install the clip in the hole and then use you finger or suitable tool to push the centre pin in until it clicks and is flush with the top again. It's really a brilliant little clip.

This is the plug spanner supplied with the bike. Do you recommend using this?
I didn't. I used a proper plug socket (has a rubber grommet inside to grab the plug insulator to make removal and installation from the plug well easier). I addition, I used a couple of 3/8" extension combos to make it all work. Finally, I used an in-lb torque wrench to tighten the plugs (~110 in-lbs), something you can't do with the tool in the OE kit. Some guys don't bother torquing (they just do "goodentight") which is fine, but if you don't have the touch/feel or are unsure or are simply obsessive about your bike, you'll want to use a torque wrench. The plugs are tiny and the threads very small and fine. Be careful if you go the goodentight route.

The RHS outer plug looks a lot more difficult compared to the LHS outer plug. The RHS plug is just slightly inboard by comparison, presumably because the timing chain is on that side of the bike? The frame looks to hinder access to this plug but I guess it looks worse than it actually is.
It's just a bit fiddly. Very doable.

Just one more point. Presumably the breather pipe running across the top of the block needs to be removed?
Nope. Remove fairings as needed for access. Loosen the rad from its mounts to allow it to be moved around. Remove the coils and do the plugs. It's fiddly and takes some time but it's not "hard."
 
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Gem rod

New member
I don't recall lifting the tank when I did the plugs on my Fazer. So not essential but it's handy to do to allow access to check/replace the air filter at the same time you do your plugs.

Thanks for the response Blackfin. I presume that the tank does lift from the front on a rear hinge? I was thinking about changing the air filter too and possibly the coolant. That would mean that the hoses could be fully disconnected allowing the rad to be moved completely perhaps?

I feel confident to have a good go at it now.:cool:
 

Blackfin

New member
Thanks for the response Blackfin. I presume that the tank does lift from the front on a rear hinge? I was thinking about changing the air filter too and possibly the coolant. That would mean that the hoses could be fully disconnected allowing the rad to be moved completely perhaps?
Yes it pivots up, hinged at the back but there's no need to disconnect anything. Remove the seats. You need to remove the side panels (the flat black plastic pieces retained in part by those trick little clips) as well as the plastic trim on the top-front of the tank. Once that stuff is out of the way, you'll see a two screws, one on each side near the front of the tank; remove those. The tank can then be lifted at the front and pivoted back to the service position.

You'll find you need a prop rod of some sort to hold it up. I found that a large metal paint-stirrer (the sort you stick into a drill to mix up driveway sealer...) fits perfectly between the headstock and the bottom of the tank.

But no hoses or electrical connections need be removed.
 

thach1130

New member
That would mean that the hoses could be fully disconnected allowing the rad to be moved completely perhaps?

I feel confident to have a good go at it now.:cool:
Hoses on the radiator do not need disconnecting. There's a drain plug near the oil drain bolt. Open the fill cap on the right side of the bike and then unscrew the drain bolt. Radiator will drain free. if you have a center stand you can rock the bike back and forth to get the fluid out. The fluids in the overflow/expansion tank should be drain too. Either find a way to siphon it or get a small airline tubing connected to a turkey baster. Good luck.
 

Gem rod

New member
Hey Thach

I guess I was suggesting that removing the rad completely may allow better access to the plugs. Removing hoses though is never as easy as it sounds I appreciate. Thanks for the tip on the drain plug though :)

The other thing I just realised from watching a youtube video is that lifting up the tank will not actually achieve a great deal in terms of plug access because of the air box! True I do plan to do the filter and plugs at the same time so such a task would make sense.

The air box would need to be removed too I presume to get better access to the plugs?? I wonder how simple that is?
 

Umyaya

New member
After getting the spark plugged loose I have used the black rubber tube that connects the spark plug to the connector to get the sparkplug out or down into the hole. I turn it a little to get it started and pull it out finish with a socket. That okay? Or bad?
 

Gem rod

New member
After getting the spark plugged loose I have used the black rubber tube that connects the spark plug to the connector to get the sparkplug out or down into the hole. I turn it a little to get it started and pull it out finish with a socket. That okay? Or bad?
The idea of a tube on the plug is better as shown in the original post. Rotating the coil plugs may damage the rubber seals them from seating properly.
 

Gem rod

New member
Just checked the plug spanner again which came as part of the Yamaha tool kit and it does have a rubber insert. Can't see why a separate 5/8 inch socket and extension set would be required?
 

Gem rod

New member
Just finished the job and here are the pics. May have to do this in three posts so apologies for that. Finally worked out how to post full size images :)

Well first I removed the black trim that goes around the fairing and clocks (see my previous post). Those press stud fasteners came out as easy as pie. Remember mine is the FZ8S with fairing.

Dropping the radiator was difficult. I removed this bolt first that holds the brake pipes to the radiator. Obviously you need these pipes to stay in position while the radiator drops.

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A word of warning. This is a pig to put back again. Notice the plastic flap prevents easy access to the bolt. I had to get my wife to bend back the plastic while I fiddled around with it. Took me ages. Here is another shot of the same bolt:

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You have to remove the cable ties that hold the fan wiring to the fan itself to give more slack allowing the radiator to move down more. Be careful not to snip the fan wires themselves!

Here are some pics showing the access once the rad is dropped. Then I'll discuss the tools. Notice in the following image how the breather pipes and gadget lie directly above the inner plugs. That makes the job tricky but I couldn't see an easy way of removing them. Best to work around them rather than do any more dismantling.

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Gem rod

New member
Once the radiator is dropped the connectors came off the plugs easily. Just press down the tab on the connectors and slide them off. The plug coils themselves were tricky. They are in very tight and needed to be rotated to loosen them a little. The inner coils are very difficult due to access. You need small hands. Once you get a good grip on them and apply enough force they will pop up.

Then comes the problem of removing the plugs. I used the plug spanner that came with the bike (see my previous post). The outer ones were easy to do but the inner ones were difficult because there is not enough room for a ratchet to rotate. I had to be creative and employ a variety of tools to get the RHS inner plug out. Remember this is a little inboard compared to the LHS inner plug because of the fact that the timing chain is on the RHS of the engine block.

Here are the tools I used.

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So you need to have a fairly comprehensive set of tools to cope with the tight space. In a previous posts it mentioned use of extension bars etc. There is just about room to get a 17mm open ended (or ring) spanner on the RHS inner plug. Be warned though it will take you a while to get this plug out. One quarter of a turn at a time until the plug becomes finger loose.
 

Gem rod

New member
So that's about the size of it. It took me the best part of a day. So you need to decide whether you fancy the challenge and save some cash or on the other hand if cash is no object then take it to the dealer.

If you are taking the job on it needs to be done slowly and surgically. There is lots of scope for screwing up. Damaging the radiator, brake pipes, cables, etc. A lot of TLC is needed.

Here are the old plugs:

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I took the advice and applied some dielectric grease to the plug coil rubbers to help them seat properly and I had no trouble at all getting them back in. You still have to apply some force to get them to 'click' back into position.

Don't try and remove the fans from the radiator. It can be done once the radiator is dropped but nothing is really gained. Also my previous idea of lifting up the tank will gain nothing as far as the plug change is concerned so my advice is don't bother with that.

Yamaha certainly did not make the job easy. I have to say it was the trickiest plug change I have ever done; far more difficult than my old CBF600 SA (2009).

So there you are. A slightly different approach to Spider Eye in the original post.

Hope it helps.

See you all soon.
 
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Fazer 8

New member
Thanks for the comprehensive write-up. It's quite ridiculous how difficult plug changes have gotten on these modern bikes. Yamaha should have put iridium/platinum/whatever long life plugs in in the first place. I would definitely go with them when I change the plugs - they have a much longer lifespan, typically.

I installed my own rear wheel last week. Most difficult one I've ever done. Didn't realize the brake caliper is supposed to be removed from its mount - never had to do that to get a rear wheel on or off before. I managed to get it off, and back on, without removing it from the hanger, albeit with a lot of cussing and sweating.
 

Gem rod

New member
Is this the price we have to pay for a pretty looking bike I wonder; or even the joys of high technology? True the Fazer 8 is fast and great to ride and arguably good value for money when compared to some of the European bikes of similar engine size however to have paid a bit more attention to maintenance would have been nice.

Yes changing the plugs was challenging but possible. It all depends on your mindset. If you plan for a full day's work, research the job first, then at least you know what to expect.

The problems begin when people blunder into these jobs expecting no more than two hours, rushing and messing up.

The back wheel is my next job as a tyre change is not far away. On my old CBF600 I had to remove the caliper and suspend it out of the way while the wheel came out so that I believe is normal for a modern machine.

Is there enough clearance for the wheel to roll out nicely? Does it roll over the paddock stand? I have no centre stand and so I wondered if the paddock stand would get in the way.
 

Fazer 8

New member
The caliper getting in the way was my only real difficulty. The bottom of the rear fender (if it hasn't been replaced with a tidy tail) is quite narrow so it's fairly easy to roll the wheel over the paddock stand and past the fender to get it into its spot. Other than that it was actually one of the easier ones I've done, because the swingarm "springs" open several millimetres after loosening the axle nut, providing some room for getting everything into place.
 

RD GUY

New member
just did the plugs,walk in the park,took me less than a hour,after undoing the rad i only had to cut the tyewrap holding the fan wire and it gave me lots of room
 
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